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This Love Is Death ( by Echezonachukwu Nduka)

Dry petals, broken filaments and anthers
Make mockery of my balcony,
These frowning flowers tell poignant tales.
On Val's eve, they bloomed.Their scents wafted beyond my rooftops as love;
Now, death is theirs and on me,
They also beckon.

Death hides its face in love's lyrics
As these songs melt my heart;
I follow the tides and crash in the arms of death,
This love is death; I'm free from its embrace.

When love storms the hearts of men,
What weathers it?
When the hearts of men break in love's battlefield,
How are they healed?
Death knocks on our hearts after love's sting.


This ticklish passion sang Calypso's* dirge as Odysseus** bade her farewell;
Romeo and Juliet embraced death in love's paradise;
Love is death and death is love.
Let it flee, I shan't sing its songs.


*Calypso: In Greek mythology, a sea nymph and daughter of the Titan Atlas. She fell in love with Odysseus and died of grief after he left.

**Odysseus: A Greek Hero who Calypso fell in love with and kept him a virtual prisoner for seven years on the mythical island of Ogygia in the Ionian Sea.
(C) Echezonachukwu Nduka 2013


The Poet: Echezonachukwu Nduka was born in Anambra, Nigeria. He attended the University of Nigeria, Nsukka where he studied Music. Till date, he performs as a concert pianist and organist. With burning enthusiasm for Literature, his poetry, short story, essays and articles have appeared in journals and magazines both online and in print. Some of his works are published in The Kalahari Review, Nsukka Journal of Music and Research (NJMAR), Literatinaija, Naija Stories, Saturday Sun, University of Nigeria Campus Hit, The African Street Writer etc. His Poetry 'My Dame of Fame' was shortlisted for 3rd Korea-Nigera Poetry Feast 2013.

Echezonachukwu belongs to several professional organizations and currently lectures at the Department of Music in Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education Owerri, Imo, Nigeria.

Twitter:@ nduka_echenduka

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